Achieving Realism with Chrysnbon

One of my favorite Chrysnbon kits is the Cookware. While not the easiest kit to work with–a lot of prep work is involved, in terms of sanding off unwanted bumps and raises–it’s incredible when finished. Moreover, it’s versatile! This set I’m finishing half in aluminum, half in copper. I’ll post about the copper, soon. But the pots don’t have to be copper! They could be aluminum, enamel, etc. Those of you who follow me on Instagram, or Facebook, know I’ve been sharing pictures (and descriptions) of my work in progress; here is the complete materials list I’ve used, along with a set of basic instructions:

Materials List

  • Chrysnbon cookware kit
  • Tamiya Fine Surface Primer Light Gray
  • Tamiya Gloss Silver Enamel (applied either as a spray or via airbrush)
  • Mr. Super Clear Flat UV Cut Spray
  • AK Interactive Weathering Pencils in the following shades:
    • Rubber
    • Smoke
    • Dark Grey
    • Streaking Dirt
    • Sepia
    • Dark Rust

Creating the “Aluminum” Base

If you’re new to the blog, please find my recommended list of studio supplies here, and my tips for getting the most out of this and every Chrysnbon kit here. Preparation is the most important step! This kit, in particular, needs a lot of sanding to look good. I usually work on these “boring” steps while either listening to podcasts or watching (really, listening) to TV. I find that having something on in the background helps me to feel more meditative.

Sometimes, I only think I’m done, spray on a coat of primer and–oh, no! There are still lumps. This is okay, as the primer I recommend (and use, almost exclusively, on my own work) sands easily. Still, I’d advise waiting 12–24 hours before trying to fix your mistakes. Otherwise the primer might flake off in chunks, creating more problems than it solves.

Once you’re happy with where you are, and your pieces are primed, it’s time to paint! Let the final coat of primer (I usually end up applying two or three fine coats) dry overnight and then start spraying on light (light!) coats of the Tamiya Gloss Silver Enamel. You want to use enamel, here, and not water-based paints, because water-based paints won’t stand up to our next step. Remember kindergarten science, and learning that oil and water don’t mix? Our pencils are water-based; they will degrade a similarly water-based finish. To keep our various layers from mixing into mud, we must alternate enamel-based and water-based.

Again, once you’re done with this step, leave the pieces to dry for another 24 hours. Dry to the touch is not dry! Because there’s so much “hurry up and wait” in this step, I tend to prep and base coat more than one kit at a time. Or, if I can’t do that, I plan this stage for a weekend where I’ll be super busy with my family. That way, I’m not tempted to poke and prod prematurely.

The final step, in this first phase, is spraying the “aluminum” with two light coats of Mr. Super Clear. This step is critical, as it gives our pencils some “tooth” on which to adhere. Otherwise, the pigment will bead up and slide right off. Mr. Super Clear, luckily, only needs a few hours to dry. And now…the fun begins!

Weathering

For each piece, weather the inside first. You want to use, from our pencils:

  • Dark Grey
  • Rubber
  • Sepia
  • Dark Rust
  • Streaking Dirt

Streaking Dirt, Sepia, and Dark Rust are excellent for modeling those mysterious layers of baked-on something. Streaking Dirt makes for really convincing grease. The others, I use to create discoloration. For achieving a realistic texture, my “secret weapons” here are makeup brushes and sea sponges. I recommend specific brushes in my studio supply list, but you should feel free to experiment and use whatever produces the best results for you. The most important thing–and the reason I spray, or airbrush instead of using brushes whenever possible for applying paint–is avoiding visible brush strokes.

Now that we’re ready to weather the outsides of our pieces, we need:

  • Smoke
  • Dark Grey
  • Rubber

Depending on how gross this cookware is supposed to be, you might also want to add in some Streaking Dirt. I’m not sure how grease gets on the bottom of everything, but it does seem to. My cookware tends to be pretty old and terrible, as this is what’s most interesting to me. Your mileage, though, will vary. Maybe your Borrowers are neater than mine.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this:
close-alt close collapse comment ellipsis expand gallery heart lock menu next pinned previous reply search share star